Essential Oils Guide

There are so many oils that offer an array of different uses. It's hard to know where to start. That's why I created this easy to use guide. For recipes for health topics and protocols see the BLOG section' for a myriad of different uses and recipes.  Remember for protocols we can't use "disease" names so if you have specific topics you want to look up contact me for support.  Members receive unlimited email support, a consultation, and full access to my members support page. 

 
 

Aromatic Use of Essential Oils

Using essential oils aromatically can influence you in a myriad of ways. Traditionally, aromatic usage has been aimed at improving a person’s mood. A better and more stable temperament can have countless benefits on your life, every single day. Direct inhalation of doTERRA’s® Elevation or Citrus Bliss ® first thing in the morning can help you wake up and motivate you to take on the day’s tasks. Diffuse essential oils with distinct top notes such as Eucalyptus and Basil throughout the day to keep you productive at work. A quick breath of Peppermint can give you the boost to make it through a tough workout. Diffusing Lavender or Vetiver at night, or adding a few drops to your pillow, can help you prepare for the restful sleep you require to get through the ensuing day. Using essential oils aromatically can be the boost you need to get through the normal stresses of day-to-day life

 

Topical Use of Essential Oils

Topical application is one of the ways you can experience the benefits of doTERRA® essential oils. This form of application is unique because it allows for localized effects in the area of the application in addition to providing whole body support. Additionally, you can use essential oils topically when you want an easy way to target specific areas on your body.

 

DILUTION BASICS

Dilution is a process in which essential oils are mixed with a carrier oil—a pure vegetable oil that helps “carry” the essential oil onto the skin. There are many benefits to dilution, including increasing the surface area of absorption, enhancing absorption through dry skin, and preventing sensitivity responses.

doTERRA’s carrier oil of choice is doTERRA Fractionated Coconut Oil due to its long shelf life and lightweight texture.

 

CLASSIFICATIONS OF OILS FOR TOPICAL USE

Neat: Oils categorized as “neat” can be applied topically without dilution because of their exceptionally mild chemistry. Frankincense, Lavender, Melaleuca, Melissa, and Sandalwood are good examples of “neat” essential oils.

Dilute: Oils in this category have potent chemistry and should be diluted with a carrier oil before topical application in every case. “Dilute” oils include Cassia, Cinnamon Bark, Clove, Oregano, and Thyme.

Sensitive: “Sensitive” oils are those that should be diluted before use on young or sensitive skin. Bergamot, Black Pepper, Eucalyptus, Ginger, and Peppermint are examples of “sensitive” oils.

 

APPLICATION SAFETY

Although unusual, occasionally it is possible to have a sensitivity response to an essential oil. This occurs when there is heightened reactivity of an essential oil that may result in an unwanted response in the body or on the skin. Awareness of your body and how it reacts to different essential oils, amounts applied, and location applications can help minimize risk and ensure safe usage.

Citrus oils contain a unique category of photosensitive compounds called furocoumarins, so it is important to avoid exposure to sunlight, sunlamps, or other sources of UV light for up to 12 hours after topical application of these oils.

More is not always better! Essential oils are very potent, so a little goes a long way. Start with 1–2 drops and then increase the dosage as necessary. Dilute, dilute, dilute! Dilution in no way diminishes the efficacy of essential oils and offers many benefits that can enhance your application experience.

Conduct a simple sensitivity test when trying a new oil by applying a small amount of essential oil to an inconspicuous area. Check the spot each hour for several hours to ensure no sensitivity has occurred.

Face: Use essential oil as part of your regular skin care regimen to beautify the skin and promote a clear, healthy looking complexion.

Neck/Forehead/Temples: These areas are good to target feelings of tension.

Abdomen: Application of essential oils, especially over major digestive organs.

Arms/Legs/Back: Massage onto the arms, wrists, legs, feet, or back after physical activity.

Roof of the Mouth (Soft Palette)/Base of the Skull: Applying oils to these areas is an excellent way to help transform your mood and balance your emotions.

Chest: Rubbing oils onto the chest promotes feelings of clear breathing.

Bottoms of Feet: The feet have large pores that rapidly absorb essential oils, making this an ideal application site for generalized effect. Apply and massage in 2–4 drops of essential oil.

 

Internal Use of Essential Oils

The French Model, which promotes taking essential oils internally, was originally advocated by three prominent aromatherapists: Jean Valnet, Paul Belaiche, and Henri Viaud. Internal use involves consuming essential oils in a vegetable capsule or softgel. They are absorbed into systemic circulation via the digestive tract. (1,2) Generally considered the most potent method of application, internal use of essential oils offers powerful effects to the body. (3-6)

This is also the most controversial mode of application, leading to much debate throughout the essential oil community in recent years. The confusion surrounding internal use of essential oils is largely based on lack of awareness. However, years of past and ongoing research have found that internal usage is a safe and profoundly efficacious application method.

Essential oils are already a normal part of your diet and the human body is well equipped to safely metabolize them (7) (see Essential Oil Metabolism). When you sprinkle cinnamon on your oatmeal, sip a mug of peppermint tea, or add fresh oregano to your pasta sauce, you are actually consuming small amounts of the volatile compounds found naturally in the plant. Essential oils give plants their aroma and flavor. When concentrated, essential oils can be used as internal supplements for more potent and targeted support.

Today, many essential oils are found on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list (8), which affirms the safe use of essential oils as flavoring agents and preservatives. Every substance found on this list has a well-documented history of internal safety. Although essential oils have health applications that extend far beyond flavoring, this list sets a safety framework that can be applied to the internal use of essential oils.

Some people express concerns about damage to mucous membranes when taking oils internally. This fear is unfounded when looked at under scientific scrutiny. See Mucous Membranes and Essential Oils to learn more. Internal use of essential oils is perfectly safe and worry-free when used properly. See Recommended Ideal Amounts for information on appropriate amounts.

Some essential oils are not recommended for internal use, such as Arborvitae, Birch, Cedarwood, Cypress, Eucalyptus, White Fir, and Wintergreen. They are best used aromatically or topically.

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